Relationships

Men are From Mars, Women are From Venus

Posted by on Apr 3, 2014 in Relationships, Resources | 0 comments

The most well-know, long-lived, and tried-and-tested relationships guide ever: the phenomenal #1 New York Times bestseller Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus . In this classic guide to understanding the opposite sex, Dr. John Gray provides a practical and proven way for men and women to improve their communication by acknowledging the differences between their needs, desires, and behaviors. No other relationship guide on the market will give you the same level of evidence-based insight sure to help you strengthen and nurture your relationships for years to come.

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Men are Like Waffles, Women are Like Spaghetti

Posted by on Mar 22, 2014 in Relationships, Resources | 0 comments


by Bill and Pam Farrel

I found this book to be very helpful in more fully “getting” that men and women think and process information differently based on how their brains are wired. Husband and wife team Bill and Pam Farrel explain how men and women can let gender differences work for–not against–them to help couples communicate well, and to support each other in relieving stress, and achieving fulfillment and satisfaction in romantic relationships. The Farrels explain why a man is like a waffle (each element of his life is in a separate box) and a woman is like spaghetti (everything in her life touches everything else). End-of-chapter questions and exercises help readers understand the different ways men and women regard life.

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The Relationship Handbook

Posted by on Mar 22, 2014 in Relationships, Resources | 0 comments

I found this book to be life transforming – not just in my romantic relationships, but in all relationships. It even helped me to have a better understanding of how to manage my own mind and cut myself slack when I find myself in a less than positive mood.

Here is a description of the book.

When couples go to a marriage counselor there are three possible outcomes: (1) they get a fresh start, (2) they stay together and “cope with” a tense or sour marriage, or (3) they separate. Every couple wants the first outcome. They want to have a fresh start and be happy together. If they can’t get a fresh start, they will jump to the third choice—separation—because they don’t want the second. They have already been coping and are tired of it. Problems and adversity are not the crux of marital discord. All couples face adversity, but it doesn’t cause problems for harmonious couples. Couples with satisfying marriages don’t “cope” with their lives and with each other. They don’t work on their marriages. The strength of their marriages lies not in their ability to cope with their problems, but in their ability to keep their bearings and to stay close. This book shows couples how to do that.

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